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A Rose for Emily: Emily Grierson

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A Rose for Emily: Emily Grierson

Debra Arnold January 14, 2011 Emily Grierson “A Rose for Emily” is a scary story by Faulkner. Emily Grierson, whose life story is told by an anonymous storyteller, who represents the mindsets and concepts of the community. When reduced by her father until his death, she takes up with a Northern worker, Homer Barron. When she is confronted with desertion from Homer, she relies on murdering him by arsenic. It was later on discovered after Emily’s death that Homer’s decomposing corpse was in the upstairs bed room for almost forty years and pushing the pillow beside him was an iron gray hair considered to be Emily’s.

By taking a look at Emily’s relationship with her father, her location in the neighborhood, and her issue with differentiating today from the past, a lot is revealed about the character of Miss Emily in the story. The Grierson family had a streak of general insanity along with a ridiculous pride. Miss Emily’s daddy, a selfish and controling man, thought that none of the boys who came courting her were good enough for their name. So he discouraged them. When he finally passed away, Emily was still unmarried and with absolutely nothing more than a home.

Homer, Emily’s suitor, with his strong masculine existence and whip-welding skills are an intriguing similarity to Emily’s aggressive dad. We see Emily’s crime as a last effort to keep a dad figure from deserting her. The disaster in the story was displayed in Emily’s failure to leave the impact of her daddy. Miss Emily’s relationship to the town was of terrific significance in the story. Everybody had looked up the Grierson’s in the town of Jefferson, Mississippi. The Griersons’ held their heads high which some of the townspeople felt too high.

The sensations of the neighborhood towards Miss Emily are really made complex. In the community’s eyes, her story is no more than a medical history. Miss Emily is denied regular participation in the life of the community due to the fact that she represents a conventional upper class of a greater social class than the majority of people. This circumstance, produced by her ancestors, is accentuated by the neighborhood, which denies Miss Emily a typical life by concerning her as their symbol of the past. She had actually become part of the history of the town. She was type of a monument, a landmark. When Miss Emily passes away, she becomes their “fallen monument”.

When Miss Emily purchased the arsenic at the pharmacy, the news spread rapidly throughout the town. The townspeople believed that she meant to eliminate herself after the disappearance of her cherished Homer, for a stylish girl would choose death to dishonor. But she does not kill herself. Emily decides to eliminate Homer instead of letting him desert her; she felt it was her only choice. The townspeople just assumed that Homer had left the town for excellent. Miss Emily’s proud self-reliance and disregard for administrative guideline brought about a certain admiration from the community itself.

Miss Emily’s outright defiance of what others think, and her persistence to living life solely on her own terms, neglecting the law, ended in a scary contortion of her own psyche. The neighborhood finds out how horrifying just after her funeral when they checked out the upper rooms of your house. The townspeople made certain Emily remained in the ground prior to they opened the locked room and what they found was what was left of her enthusiast from forty years in the past. It is as if the town recognized that she had actually made a right to this extension of her hard-won and bitterly maintained privacy to wait up until she was buried prior to going through her home.

In conclusion, Miss Emily Grierson is a victim of her own pride. She did not crumble under pressures; she did not give up. She insisted on choosing a lover in spite of the criticism of the town. She declined to be jilted. She was not to be refused or pitied. She led an idle and worthless life. She was driven to criminal acts in desperate efforts to stimulate something of love’s fulfillment. These acts were neither life giving or redeeming; on the contrary, she was led into a life of frustration, perversion, seclusion, and decay. Bibliography Faulkner, William. A Rose For Emily. 1930.

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