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Analysis of a Rose for Emily

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Analysis of a Rose for Emily

Analysis of A Rose for Emily Miss Emily represents the “old south.” She is stubborn and she refuses to accept that the world is changing around her. The people of the town frequently chatter about Miss Emily. Making use of significance and foreshadowing is a significant component of the story. Miss Emily represents the “old south.” She lives in her dad’s house with her Negro servant Tobe. She has resided in the town and has actually been a member of the community for as long as anyone can remember. The people of the town feel that “Miss Emily had actually been a tradition, a task, and a care; a sort of hereditary responsibility upon the town. (3) Miss Emily persists and contradicts that the world around her has altered. An example of her stubbornness is the rejection to pay her taxes. Miss Emily states,” I have no taxes in Jefferson. Colonel Sartoris discussed it to me.” (8) Another example of Miss Emily’s refusal to alter to society around her is “when the town got free postal delivery, Miss Emily alone declined to let them attach the metal number above her door and connect a mailbox to it.” (50) Miss Emily had been considered a pillar of the community at one time.

Times have altered and the community “Believed that the Grierson’s held themselves a little to high for what they were.” (25) This informs the reader that the Grierson’s social status is not what it when was. Her daddy raised Miss Emily alone. She believed that she was in a higher class than anyone else in the town. The townspeople talk of “all the boys her father had actually repelled.” (28) Her father might have felt that no guy was great enough for his child. When Miss Emily did satisfy somebody, Homer Baron, there was talk of him being gay. “Homer himself had said? e liked males, and it was known that he drank with the more youthful men in the Elk’s Club.” (42) The women of the town liked to gossip about Miss Emily. They spoke about her getting married to Homer Baron. People even gossiped about Miss Emily and Homer Baron having a relationship. They thought that it was a “disgrace to the town and a bad example to the youths.” (44) They believed that her being with a guy that was not Southern would break her Southern upbringing. Miss Emily’s neighbor thought that she was a terrible maid because there was an odor coming from her house.

The guys of the community did not want to get included. They had regard for Miss Emily. Instead of confronting Miss Emily, in the middle of the night the guys snuck over to Miss Emily’s house and sprayed lime all over. In simply a couple of weeks the odor was gone. The females also talked of the possibility of Miss Emily being outrageous due to the fact that “her excellent Auntie had gone entirely insane.” (25) Importance is a major element of Faulkner’s story. Literature: An Intro Into Reading and Composing specifies symbolism as “A particular word, concept, or object that may represent ideas, values, persons, or lifestyles. (2006) One example of symbolism is that Miss Emily contradicts altering times. She signified a completely various era. Faulkner uses symbolism to compare the Grierson house with Miss Emily’s social status and her rejection to alter. The house is referred to as “white, embellished with cupolas and spires and scrolled verandas in the heavily lightsome design of the seventies.” (2) This description recommends to the reader that your home was very large and was constructed to impress the people of the town. This also represents Miss Emily’s social status.

Another example is when the house is described as being “stubborn and coquettish decay above the cotton wagons and gasoline pumps.” (2) Miss Emily would decline the fact that her father had actually passed away. “She told them that her daddy was not dead.” (27) This is another example that Miss Emily might not accept change. Faulkner likewise uses the foreshadowing in “A Rose for Emily.” Foreshadowing is defined as, “To provide a sign or a recommendation of in advance; presage.” by the American Heritage Dictionary. One example of foreshadowing is when Faulkner describes Miss Emily. Her skeleton was little and extra.” (6) This leads the reader to end of the story when they discover the skeleton of Homer Baron. Another example of foreshadowing is when Miss Emily’s hair is being explained. It is being described as “vigorous, iron gray, like the hair of an active man.” (48) This sets the tone for the finding of the gray hair in the bed beside the corpse of Homer Baron. This also suggests to the reader that she was sleeping in the bed with him and even suggests necrophilia. Functions Cited Faulkner, William. A Rose for Emily.” Literature: Reading, Reacting, and Composing. Ed. Edgar V. Roberts and Henry E. Jacobs. Compact 7th ed. Upper Saddle River: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2004. 130-35. “Foreshadow.” The American Heritage ® Dictionary of the English Language. Fourth ed. Copyright © 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Business. http://education. yahoo. com/reference/dictionary/ entry/foreshadow “Symbolism” Literature: Reading, Reacting, and Composing. Ed. Edgar V. Roberts and Henry E. Jacobs. Compact 7th ed. Upper Saddle River: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2004. 2006.

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