Hit enter after type your search item

Finding Love in Romeo and Juliet

/
/
/
26 Views

Finding Love in Romeo and Juliet

The style of love is typically associated with peace and compassion. Nevertheless, in Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, the 2 enthusiasts’ self-destructive impulse shows love as a cause of self-destructive violence, as seen through their ideas, words and actions. First of all, Romeo and Juliet’s self-destructive thoughts reveal the violence triggered by their love. Simply put, it is their intense passion for each other that causes their contemplation of suicide. For instance, when Romeo is told of Juliet’s expected death, he right away considers killing himself and begins to prepare his suicide, as shown by the following quote: “Well, Juliet, I will lie with thee tonight. Let’s see for means.” (Shakespeare, V, i, 34) This shows that his love for Juliet is so effective that he can not even consider life without her and sees suicide as his only alternative. Also, Juliet plans to devote suicide if she can not be with Romeo. Before taking Friar Lawrence’s potion, Juliet realizes that if it were inadequate, she would have no option but to marry Paris. In order to avert this undesired marital relationship, she elaborates a plan to stab herself with her dagger. Juliet is so madly in love with Romeo that she immediately contemplates suicide at the thought of facing life without him. Provided the above, it is clear that Romeo and Juliet’s love for one another instills violent, self-destructive ideas in their minds.
Moreover, through the enthusiasts’ words, Shakespeare illustrates violence as an item of love. Romeo and Juliet both declare that they would rather eliminate themselves than be separated. For example, when Romeo discovers he is banished from Verona, he asks “‘Be merciful,'” say death'” (III, iii, 12). This plea for death rather than being forced to leave Juliet is an example of the violence motivated by his passion for her. Similarly, Juliet mentions that she would “leap, instead of wed Paris, from off the battlements of any tower” (IV, i, 77-78) This shows that Juliet likes Romeo so ardently that she would rather die than be wed to another man. Therefore, the couple’s words expose the violence that their love imbues in them.
Lastly, Romeo and Juliet’s violent actions, significantly their suicide attempts, are fueled by their love for each other. For example, when Romeo is told about Juliet’s grieving, he believes his name is responsible because his belonging to the Montagues provoked the battle that lead to Tybalt’s death and his own exile. Because Romeo enjoys Juliet, he dislikes his name and feels” [his] name did murder her, as that name’s cursed hand murder ‘d her kinsman.” (III, iii, 103-105) Consequently, the regret of having actually inflicted sadness on his cherished leads him to attempt suicide, which he believes will “sack the despiteful estate” (III, iii, 107-108) of his name. It is his love for Juliet that triggers this violent action. Also, Juliet’s suicide is brought about by her overwhelming love for Romeo. Upon finding her dead fan, Juliet kisses Romeo’s lips, in hopes that “some poison yet doth hang on them to make [her] die with a restorative.” (V, iii, 165-166) This effort to kill herself through an act of love shows love as a reason for violence. In summary, the motives behind the enthusiasts’ multiple attempts at suicide show that their love triggers them to act strongly. In conclusion, it is clear that in Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, love is portrayed as a cause of violence. This is conveyed through the lovers’ suicidal desire, which they think about, speak of and act upon. Nevertheless, regardless of being the source of much destruction, love becomes an elegant emotion, motivating some of the most gorgeous poetry ever composed.

This div height required for enabling the sticky sidebar