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The Corruptive Nature of Power-Animal Farm by George Orwell

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The Corruptive Nature of Power-Animal Farm by George Orwell

The Corruptive Nature of Power (as checked out in George Orwell’s Animal Farm) “Power tends to corrupt; absolute power damages absolutely.” -Lord Acton The nature of male is to desire power, and when guy accomplishes power he wants more. Even the very best intents, such as those of the freshly formed Animal Farm, can be damaged by the basic human impulse of greed.

In the beginning of Animal Farm, after the wicked Farmer Jones is overthrown, the animals are filled with visions of a land where all animals are equal and interact in consistency to produce a much better world (the standard concept of Communism). This appears like a great idea on paper, however sadly things started to go south. From the very beginning, the pigs at once presume a role of management. In the very first harvest on the brand-new Animal Farm, the pigs naturally handle a leadership role since of their remarkable intelligence. All the other animals do not see a problem with this.

So even though among the rules of Animalism is that all animals are equivalent, the pigs are already set up as superior and soon they are obtaining more power. Despite their power, things do not escalate up until the concept of the windmill is proposed by Snowball. We see a power struggle take place between Napoleon and Snowball. Both pigs are accustomed to power and hesitate to have anybody be more effective than them. Napoleon, not wishing to lose power, gets rid of the opposition and promptly asserts his dominance.

The additional taste of power that followed rapidly destroyed any remaining good-will that he may have had. The other pigs shortly realized the benefits of being the dominant animal on the farm, and helped Napoleon with the subjugation of the “lower animals.” After that, the running of Animal Farm ends up being about making the lives of the pigs and pets easier, masked by the distorted sense that Squealer spread and comforted the animals with, whenever they would become wary of the actions of the pigs.

By the end of the book we see a total improvement of the pigs into something no much better than the people that came in the past. George Orwell’s views on power and corruption are vital throughout the story which signifies a similar fall of Soviet Russia into what he himself referred to as a “hierarchical society in which the rulers run out factor to quit power than any other ruling class.” Napoleon and the pigs had absolute power and they were corrupted absolutely.

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