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Violence in Romeo and Juliet

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Violence in Romeo and Juliet

Romeo and Juliet, by Shakespeare, is a play which shows how prejudice causes escalating violence. Prejudice results in violence shown in the play when the feuding families, the Montagues and Capulets, battle. In each case, disturbance, battling, injuries and death happen. Likewise, the prejudice between the 2 households never ever was dealt with, since they were enemies. The feuding started in Act 1 Scene 1, when the Capulets and Montague servants challenged each other. The Capulets’ servants insult the Montagues and this results in a street brawl of the two families. Moreover, in Act 3 Scene 1, the hatred in between the households worsens.

When Tybalt wanted vengeance versus the Montagues, he then challenged Romeo and Mercutio and began a battle. In addition, the fight between the families got back at worse, when Tybalt killed Mercutio. Also, in Act 5 Scene 3, Tybalt challenges Romeo to eliminate and Romeo kills him. The street in Verona, a public place, is where the feuding starts in between the 2 families. In Act 1 Scene 1, Sampson and Gregory, servants for the Capulets, insulted the Montagues’ servants, Balthasar and Abraham. This leads to a fight, which involves the Lords of both households and the Prince.

No death occurred, however the households’ attitudes against each other were even worse than before. This created hate in between the households, which result in violence. In like way, another duel between the 2 feuding families starts up, again, in the street of Verona in Act 3 Scene 1. When Mercutio and Benvolio, buddies of Romeo, are confronted by Tybalt, who still hates the Montagues. Tybalt thinks that they crashed the Capulets’ ball and he wants vengeance. Mercutio and Tybalt combat each other. Now, Romeo arrives attempting to stop the argument. Tybalt draws his sword and challenges Romeo.

Romeo refuses to fight and Mercutio steps in to satisfy Tybalt’s obstacles. Romeo again, attempts to stop the battling, however Tybalt stabs Mercutio under Romeo’s arm. Mercutio dies from his injury and this triggered more disruption in between the households. Rather of a Capulet eliminating a Montague, in Act 5 Scene 3, a Montague eliminates a Capulet as hatred causes violence once again. In the Capulets’ tomb during the night, Paris, a young nobleman, has actually come to pay his respect to his “lost” Juliet. When he hears the footsteps of his enemies Romeo and Balthasar, Paris believes Romeo has come to desecrate Juliet’s grave in an ct of retaliation. Nevertheless, young Romeo was only attempting to see his dead love. However Paris didn’t know, so he challenges Romeo to a fight and Romeo kills Paris. This loss of life was triggered by irrational prejudice, which caused violence? consisting of injuries, death and disturbance. By reading Romeo and Juliet, one finds out that the play shows how bias results in intensifying violence– the opening brawl begun by the servants, the duels between Mercutio and Tybalt and Romeo and Paris, and lastly the deaths of Romeo and Juliet. By Shakespear

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